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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 19-22

Trauma team training: A key to success


1 Assistant Professor, College of Medicine, Ajman University; Adjunct Assistant Professor, College of Medicine, Sharjah University; GIT and Trauma Senior Specialist Surgeon, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City Ajman, United Arab Emirates
2 Intern, Al Qassimi Hospital, Ajman, United Arab Emirates
3 Consultant General Surgeon, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City Ajman, United Arab Emirates
4 Specialist General Surgeon, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City Ajman, United Arab Emirates
5 General Practitioner, Sheikh Khalifa Medical City Ajman, United Arab Emirates

Correspondence Address:
Amer Hashim Al Ani
Adjunct Assistant Professor, College of Medicine, Sharjah University, Assistant Professor, College of Medicine, Ajman University, GIT and Trauma Surgeon Sheikh Khalifa Medical City Ajman
United Arab Emirates
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/hmj.hmj_40_21

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Background: Worldwide, trauma constitutes 10% of all causes of death. In the United Arab Emirates, trauma is the second leading cause of death for both national and expatriate populations, accounting for over 20% of all fatalities. Trauma affects all age groups, especially adolescents and young adults. Most trauma cases are preventable. Morbidity and mortality can be decreased after trauma by adopting a systematic approach towards trauma victims. Simulation-based training is beneficial in that it allows us to amplify a variety of real-life situations without compromising patient safety. Objectives: This study aims to assess the impact of trauma team training (TTT) on the performance of the trauma team and the time spent by the patient in the emergency department. Methods: In Sheikh Khalifa Medical City of Ajman, the TTT program was started early in 2016 for all members of the trauma team including (trauma team leaders, hand on surgeons, emergency room physicians, airway nurses, IV access nurses, documenting nurses and circulatory nurses) in addition to personnel recruited during trauma management like (anaesthetists, orthopaedic surgeons, blood bank physicians, radiology technicians, intensive care unit nurses, theatre nurses, laboratory and blood bank technicians, etc.). The 1-day training program, concentrated on the discipline of each member of the trauma team during simulated patient treatment, and his role in the team. Assessment of the impact of TTT on the performance of the trauma team was done by interrogating the participants in this training. The time spent to resuscitate the patient in the emergency department was measured before and after the training of the trauma team personnel. Results: After the TTT was employed, the results showed that there was a decrease by approximately 75% in the meantime of performance from 220.8 min to 54.48 min. This was in accordance to the patient's stay in the ER which decreased significantly from 9 to 827 min pre-training to 14–206 min post-training. Conclusion: Training reinforces the already learned skills, corrects and minimise mistakes. Implementation of TTT is of utmost importance to be adapted in every trauma centre to achieve optimal performance and benefit to the patient.


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