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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2022  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 180-186

Smartphone use and perception towards the usefulness and practicality of its applications amongst Ghanaian anaesthetists


1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, SMD, CHS, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology; Directorate of Anaesthesia, School of Anaesthesia, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana
2 Department of Medicine, Viswabhatathi Medical College, Kurnool, Andhra Pradesh, India
3 Department of Public Health, School of Public Health, CHS, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi, Ghana
4 Directorate of Anaesthesia, School of Anaesthesia, Komfo Anokye Teaching Hospital, Kumasi, Ghana

Correspondence Address:
Sanjeev Singh
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, CHS, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Kumasi
Ghana
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/hmj.hmj_36_22

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Background: In recent years, smartphone applications (apps) have generated an increasing interest worldwide. Anaesthesia, as a profession, has been one of the first to adopt new technologies. Aims and Objectives: This study aimed to assess the pattern of smartphone use in anaesthesia practice (duration, frequency and purpose of use), determine the perception of its use and identify factors influencing smartphone usage in anaesthesia practice and installation of anaesthesia-related apps amongst anaesthetists in Ghana. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional survey of 284 randomly selected Ghanaian anaesthetists was conducted from January 2018 to August 2018, using a previously validated perception domain to measure the perception towards the usefulness and practicality of smartphones. To find the predictors of smartphone use and the installation of medical-related apps in anaesthetic practice, logistic regression models were used. Results: Two hundred and seventy-two anaesthetists responded with a response rate of 95.8%, and 75.9% installed anaesthesia-related apps, whereas 46.1% utilised them. The perception of anaesthetists towards the usefulness and practicality of smartphones in anaesthesia practice was 57.3 ± 18.6 and 61.2 ± 16.8, respectively; the overall percentage mean score was 59.3 ± 17.6, which was less than satisfactory. Only 17.4% of anaesthetists reported a positive level of perception towards smartphone use and practicality. Smartphone usage was 25.4% amongst anaesthetists with negative perceptions towards its usage. The mean total perception mean score was a significant predictor of both smartphone usage (β = 0.031, P < 0.001) and the installation of anaesthesia apps (β = 0.032, P < 0.001) after controlling for possible confounders. Conclusion: Smartphone utilisation in anaesthesia practice is low amongst Ghanaian anaesthetists. This could be ascribed to their less than satisfactory level of perception towards smartphone use in anaesthesia practice. On the other hand, their use and installation of apps in anaesthesia practice were predicted by the perceived usefulness and practicality of their use.


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